Education for Children

 

 

Education is an essential right, which permits each person to receive instruction and to blossom socially. The right to an education is vital for the economic, social and cultural development of all societies.

Education: an important apprenticeship

Education permits one to acquire basic knowledge

Education entails that its subjects acquire a variety of knowledge. It begins with the acquisition of elementary knowledge—that is to say, literacy—on the part of the youngest members of society. At this stage, children learn to read and write thanks to primary instruction and parental oversight.

This is an essential stage which will permit the child to pursue his/her education by integrating secondary and post-secondary instruction.

Education also consists of a form of learning that is necessary for the development of one’s personality and identity, as well as his physical and intellectual capabilities. Education permits, notably, the transmission of common principles to new generations, and the conservation and perpetuation of social values. It also contributes to the flourishing of individuality through the enhancement of social and professional integration.

Education has as its ultimate objective the improvement of a person’s quality of life. It offers to underprivileged adults and children a chance to escape from poverty. It is thus an essential tool for the economic, social and cultural development of all populations around the world.

The Right to an Education: a fundamental and universal right

Education must be accessible to all children

Education is a human right which ought to be accessible to everyone, without any discrimination. All children must be able to go to school, and thereby benefit from the same opportunities to build a future. Additionally, educational instruction must be equally gratuitous so that children from disadvantaged environments will be able to enjoy their right to an education.

Educational instruction must be of an excellent quality

Beyond the question of accessibility, the right to an education also supposes that the objectives of learning will be attained. This means that all children have the right to benefit from a quality education adapted to their needs. Moreover, professors must be trained in techniques of teaching which combine pedagogy and play for the purpose of arousing children’s interest.

It is the responsibility of countries to guarantee each child’s right to an education. They must focus their efforts on primary instruction so as to make schools accessible and free for all children and thus enable them to learn to read and write.

How healthy behaviour supports children’s wellbeing?

 

 

The wellbeing and health of children in England is of paramount importance now
and into the future, but compared to other Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries we could
be doing better. A recent report from the Children’s Society1 says that child wellbeing has dipped since 2008 after a period of improvement from 1994. It found that while four- fths of children are ‘ ourishing’, meaning they are satis ed as a whole and nd their lives worthwhile, 10%, or half a million, are ‘languishing’ and score poorly on measures of wellbeing.

 

Read document here

Internet safety for children

 

The Internet has brought the world into our homes and is a veritable treasure trove of information for all the family to explore. From homework help, to online gaming, messaging and researching, our children can gain a lot from the web.

But at the same time it’s essential we ensure our children’s safety online. They must use it responsibly and parents should take measures to protect them from potentially harmful content.

Internet safety and computer security for children

A good start is to learn a bit about the kind of things our children are interested in, help them locate suitable sites (which you can bookmark as favourites) before looking at additional software and browser functions to stop them stumbling across unsuitable sites. Another good tip is to encourage them to share information with us and talk about the sites they’ve visited from the very first time they use the web, this helps to create a sense of security, respect and openness that they can continue to apply as their use of the web increases.

Fortunately as the Internet grows, so do the governing bodies and protective powers that keep unsolicited, explicit and un-moderated sites in check – however, there is still a risk that your child might stumble upon something inappropriate so it’s essential to help them, talk to them and encourage them to be responsible at all times.

Below we have outlined some of the potential problems that threaten internet safety for children.

Top ten threats against internet safety for children

1- Explicit websites

Even the most innocent word when entered into a search engine can throw up links to websites full of inappropriate images. Without parental controls, many of these websites can be accessed freely by your children.

2- Inappropriate instructional websites

A simple homework task could accidentally give your child access to one of many ‘how-to’ websites. While most of these are genuine, some are more sinister with details on how to construct bombs, conceal anorexia or how to make and take illegal drugs.

3- Chat room safety

The dangers of paedophiles posing as children in Internet chat rooms is well known – but children still put themselves at risk by giving out their personal details in online chat rooms for teenagers.

4- Cyber bullying

Online bullying is a relatively new issue. Through the use of email, chat-rooms and forums, bullies can attack their victims with vicious messages.

5- Phishing

This is when you receive an email that looks as if it’s been sent by a genuine source, such as your bank or a well known website, but really they are ‘phishing’ for your password and account details, leaving you open to identity theft.

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